Photo courtesy of WLTW Archives

Patriotic, vibrant, active women are the heart of Wilmington Ladies Tea Walk Chapter, NSDAR.
Meet our chapter.

We are the Wilmington Ladies Tea Walk Chapter, National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Our chapter serves New Hanover County, North Carolina, and includes the Wilmington, Carolina Beach, and Wrightsville Beach areas. Our community is rich in American history with the port city of Wilmington being founded in 1739. Our area of southeastern North Carolina played a vital part in the Revolutionary War and the formation of our nation. Our goal is to promote historical education, historical preservation, and patriotism. We support many outreach and service events in and around our community as well as national projects sponsored by the DAR.

Our chapter meets the first Thursday of the month, September through May, in the early evening.

We welcome you to contact us and visit one of our meetings.

Our chapter Patriots
Contact us!

Photo courtesy of Gina Thompson

Our chapter activities and community service

Photo courtesy of Gina Thompson

Patriotic Activities

  • Lay wreaths at Wilmington National Cemetery in Wreaths Across America ceremony

  • Support local Sgt. Eugene Ashley Transition Living Center of Wilmington (Ashley House) veterans
  • Sponsor JROTC Military Balls for Eugene Ashley High School
  • Participate in naturalization ceremonies for new United States citizens on the Battleship North Carolina
  • Sponsor yearly patriotic window display at New Hanover County public library

  • Pass out pocket constitutions at Trick or Treat Under the Sea at the North Carolina Aquarium

  • Present DAR Good Citizens Award to local high school students

  • Provide surprise snacks for local first responders

Photo courtesy of WLTW Archives

Preservation Activities

  • Mark graves of American Revolutionary War soldiers

  • Sponsor Society of the Honor Guard, Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, 100th anniversary commemoration, Centennial Sponsor

  • Participate in flag retirement  ceremonies
  • Partner with Home Depot to renovate local veteran homes

  • Participate in Moores Creek Battleground wreath laying ceremony
  • Distribute pocket constitutions on the strand at Carolina Beach, a nationally recognized DAR program

  • Participate in Bells Across America to honor the signing of the U. S. Constitution

  • Clean up historic Oakwood Cemetery

Photo courtesy of Kristin Bedford

Educational Outreach

  • Support Crossnore Community for Children with supplies and donations

  • Present Constitution Week & Veterans Day Programs and displays at Cape Fear Community College and local schools

  • Present “Skittles” program for New Hanover County schools, teaching taxation without representation

  • Host National Defense Luncheon for JROTC Eugene Ashley High School
  • Distribute pocket constitutions at various local events

  • Sponsor the American History Essay Contest in New Hanover County schools for grades 5-8

  • Hold Constitution Continuing Education Classes for local lawyers

Our chapter history

Photo courtesy of Jo Campbell

Charter Members: Front Row: Marjorie JoAnn Weaver Campbell, Angela Gay Smith Waldrof, Diana Seals Wood, Sandra Earl Hicks McKeithan, Tammsie Josephine Green Lynch, Lyndsay Sly Benson (Millard)
Second Row: Grace Irene Benson Smith, Marjorie Ann Benson Wall, Melissa Gwyn McKeithan Rohwer, Heather Elizabeth McLain Black, Lois Enid Sly Walton, Mary Lynn Walton Benson

  • Chapter home – Battleship North Carolina

  • Chapter emblem – tea camellia
  • Chapter colors – indigo for wisdom and silver for feminine

Founding
The Wilmington Ladies Tea Walk Chapter, NSDAR, was formed on December 8, 2007 in Wilmington, North Carolina, with 13 founding members. Our chapter home is the Battleship North Carolina, our chapter emblem is the tea camellia, and our chapter colors are indigo for wisdom and silver for the feminine.

History of our name
Ask most Americans and they will know about the Boston Tea Party, but how many are familiar with the Wilmington Tea Party of 1775, in which women of the port city played a vital role?
Wilmington women publicly opposed British trade policies and swore to never buy tea again until such policies were remanded. Although the tea tax was minimal, it enraged many because tea was the popular nonalcoholic drink of the era. Tea parties offered an effective political arena to protest taxation. Sometime between March 25 and April 5, 1775, the women of Wilmington actually burned their tea to protest imposing trade legislation and increased taxation. Their actions showed that, in the spring of 1775, many Wilmington residents, like their counterparts in the other American colonies, opposed increased British taxation and trade restrictions. Wilmington Ladies Tea Walk takes its name from these patriotic ladies.

*excerpts taken from When Wilmington Threw A Tea Party: Women and Political Awareness in Revolution-Era North Carolina
by Dr. Troy L. Kickler

Our chapter history

Charter Members: Front Row: Marjorie JoAnn Weaver Campbell, Angela Gay Smith Waldrof, Diana Seals Wood, Sandra Earl Hicks McKeithan, Tammsie Josephine Green Lynch, Lyndsay Sly Benson (Millard)
Second Row: Grace Irene Benson Smith, Marjorie Ann Benson Wall, Melissa Gwyn McKeithan Rohwer, Heather Elizabeth McLain Black, Lois Enid Sly Walton, Mary Lynn Walton Benson

  • Chapter home – Battleship North Carolina

  • Chapter emblem – tea camellia
  • Chapter colors -indigo for wisdom & silver for feminine

Founding
The Wilmington Ladies Tea Walk Chapter was formed on December 8, 2007 in Wilmington, North Carolina, with 13 founding members. Our chapter home is the Battleship North Carolina, chapter emblem the tea camellia and chapter colors are indigo for wisdom and silver for the feminine.

History of our name
Most Americans are familiar with the details of the Boston Tea Party but how many are familiar with the far more incendiary Wilmington Tea Party of 1775, also lead by women?
Wilmington women publicly opposed British trade policies and swore to never buy tea again until such policies were remanded. Although the tea tax was minimal, it enraged many because tea was the popular nonalcoholic drink of the era. Tea parties offered an effective political arena to protest taxation. Sometime between March 25 and April 5, 1775, the women of Wilmington actually burned their tea to protest imposing trade legislation and increased taxation. Their actions showed that, in the spring of 1775, many Wilmington residents, like their counterparts in the other American colonies, opposed increased British taxation and trade restrictions. Wilmington Ladies Tea Walk takes its name from these patriot ladies.

Our chapter officers

Ann Moore
Ann MooreRegent
Autumn Leonard
Autumn LeonardVice Regent
Jennifer Sturm
Jennifer SturmChaplain
Gina Thompson
Gina ThompsonCorresponding Secretary
Amy Emerson
Amy EmersonTreasurer
Kristin Bedford
Kristin BedfordRegistrar
Sherri Cane
Sherri CaneHistorian
Megan Robertson
Megan RobertsonLibrarian

Children of the American Revolution

Wilmington Ladies Tea Walk Chapter, NSADR, sponsors the New Hanover Association Society of the National Society of the Children of the American Revolution (C.A.R.), founded in 1895, is the nation’s oldest, largest patriotic youth organization. Membership is open to anyone under the age of 22, lineally descended from someone who rendered material aid to the cause of American independence as a soldier, sailor, civil officer, or recognized patriot in one of the several Colonies or States, or of the United States. C.A.R. activities focus on patriotism, service, and education about our American heritage.

Photos courtesy of Jennifer Sturm

Children of the American Revolution

Wilmington Ladies Tea Walk Chapter sponsors the New Hanover Association Society of the National Society of the Children of the American Revolution. C.A.R., founded in 1895, is the nation’s oldest, largest patriotic youth organization. Membership is open to anyone under the age of 22, lineally descended from someone who rendered material aid to the cause of American independence as a soldier, sailor, civil officer, or recognized patriot in one of the several Colonies or States, or of the United States. C.A.R. activities focus on patriotism, service, and education about our American heritage.

Our Patriots